Old-Fashioned Southern Peach Cobbler

Honey, brace yourselves for a spoonful of Southern charm with my mouthwatering Southern Peach Cobbler Recipe courtesy of my Big Mama (grandmother)! This baby is the perfect blend of sweet and decadent, – ideal for those laid-back summer days or whenever your soul’s craving a little cozy comfort. Got canned peaches or a bunch of fresh ones? Doesn’t matter! Whip up this peachy delight with its sweet spiced peaches and scrumptious homemade butter pie crust, and watch it become the star of any gathering.

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Southern peach cobbler with canned peaches served up in a casserole dish with a spoon digging into it and two scoops of ice cream on top.

There’s nothing quite like the rich, comforting taste of a traditional Southern Peach Cobbler. Revered as a quintessential dish of the South, this dessert boasts sun-kissed, syrupy peaches tucked in a golden, flaky crust that will have you sayin’ mmm with each and every bite. Whether you’re using store-bought peaches or those freshly picked from a Georgia orchard, this recipe captures the heart and soul of southern kitchens.

Why I Love Peach Cobbler

Homemade peach cobbler is my all-time favorite dessert, and Big Mama’s was a masterpiece.  She loved to surprise me with one whenever I visited. I sometimes surprised myself with how much I could eat in one sitting, especially if it was topped with homemade vanilla ice cream!

The moment I first tasted peach cobbler is a moment etched in my memory that I can’t seem to ever forget. Just imagine ripe peaches, zests, and syrupy sweetness bubbling beneath the delicate lattice of a buttery and flaky pastry.  It just don’t get no better than that baby!

Why You’ll Love This Old-Fashioned Peach Cobbler

  • A True Southern-Style Peach Cobbler. It’s more like a deep dish peach pie casserole with a bottom crust and lattice-style top crust.
  • A Classic Dessert Perfect for a Crowd. Need an easy dessert to feed a crowd? Cobbler is definitely the answer since it serves more than a pie on its own.
  • Great Flavor Combination. Sweet peaches in a thick syrup are cooked surrounded by a buttery pie crust.
  • Warm, Comforting Spices: The hints of cinnamon and nutmeg wrap around you like a comforting hug on a cool evening.
  • Perfect for Sunday Suppers: Imagine serving this cobbler after a hearty meal, its sweet aroma filling the home, drawing everyone to the table once again.

Ingredients to Make A Classic Peach Cobbler

This is the classic done right and done the old-fashioned way.  Southern peach cobbler can’t get any better than this. Though I have made homemade peach cobbler more times than I can count, it really doesn’t require more than a few simple ingredients.  

  • Canned or fresh peaches: The beauty of this recipe is that you can make it with fresh, frozen, or canned peaches. This means you can enjoy peach cobbler year-round! Just make sure to check the notes if you’re using fresh or frozen, as you will need to make a few little adjustments.
  • Salted butter: Works with the sugar to create the sweet sauce that surrounds the peaches. You will need more for the pie crust too! Make sure the butter for the crust is very cold.
  • Granulated sugar: It’s my preference for creating the sweet spiced peaches and syrup you want. I find that adding brown sugar gives a little too much strong flavor with the addition of molasses. You’re also going to add just a bit to the pie crust as well.
  • Spices: You will need ground cinnamon and nutmeg to enhance the flavor of the filling, along with a little sprinkle on top if you like!
  • Pure vanilla extract: It really rounds out the flavor of the peach filling. Make sure you use real vanilla extract and not imitation. You can truly taste the difference. If you really want to up the ante on vanilla, try vanilla bean paste.
  • All-purpose flour: Just a touch to help thicken the sweet syrup for the filling and the main ingredient in the perfect pie crust for cobbler.
  • Cold water: It’s essential that you use COLD water.
  • Egg: Used to make an egg wash topped with ground cinnamon that’s the final Southern touch to make your peach cobbler as authentic as possible. The egg wash will ensure you have a golden brown crust.
Ingredients to make peach cobbler on the table.

How to Make A True Southern Peach Cobbler

  1. Add two cans of drained peaches and one with the light syrup to a large pot along with the butter. When the butter melts, stir in the sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla. Allow the peaches to come to a boil. Then add a slurry made with some of the peach syrup and the flour.
  2. Cook the peaches in the syrup until it thickens and coats the back of a spoon, about 30-40 minutes. Remove it from the heat and allow it to cool down and further thicken while you make the pie crust.
  3. Combine the flour, sugar, and salt in a bowl and whisk together.
  4. Add your butter cubes to the flour and use your pastry cutter to cut the butter into the flour mixture until it resembles various-sized crumbs. Slowly add the cold water to the flour until a ball of dough forms. Knead the dough quickly to bring it together. Let the dough rest in the fridge. 

PRO TIP: Start with a half cup of water and then add more if you need it. You want to add just enough water for the dough to come together.

Collage of images including cooking the peaches in syrup and making the pie crust for the cobbler.
  1. Remove the dough from the fridge and add a bit of flour to your work surface or clean counter and place the dough on top. Roll out one ball of dough using a rolling pin until it’s about ⅓ inch thick. 
  2. Place it on the bottom and up the sides of a 9×13 inch baking pan.
  3. Add the peaches using a slotted spoon. Add the syrup from the pot to the peaches in the crust.

PRO TIP: The amount of syrup you add is completely up to you. You can add less if you like a thicker cobbler. However, I recommend using at least two-thirds of the mixture since it will continue to thicken as it bakes. 

  1. Roll out the final dough ball and decorate the top of the peach cobbler with a lattice crust, criss-cross pattern, or cutouts. Brush the top of the dough with egg wash then sprinkle the top lightly with ground cinnamon before baking in the oven.
A collage of steps in making peach cobbler with rolling out the bottom crust then adding the peaches and topping with a lattice crust.

Tips for Making the Best Peach Cobbler with Canned Peaches

If you’re new to cooking, don’t worry! Here are a few tips to help you get started:

  • If you’re using fresh peaches, make sure they’re ripe for the best flavor. When they aren’t in season, it just isn’t the same.
  • Don’t over-mix the dough for the pie crust, as this can make it tough.
  • Don’t be afraid to get creative with the pie crust design. You can use a lattice pattern, a criss-cross pattern, or even cut the dough into decorative shapes for your peach cobbler.
  • It is important that you keep all of your ingredients very cold when making traditional cobbler so it comes out exactly like you want it. It’s the key to a flaky pie crust.
  • If you use frozen or fresh peaches, you will need to add a bit more butter and sugar when making the syrup since you won’t be getting a head start with syrup from one of the cans.
  1. Fruit Variations: While peaches are what this cobbler recipe calls for, you can easily substitute or mix them with other fruits like nectarines, blueberries, or blackberries for a different flavor profile.
  2. Sweeteners: Instead of granulated sugar, try brown sugar or even maple syrup in your peach cobbler filling for a deeper, caramelized sweetness.
  3. Spices: Cardamom or allspice can be added alongside or in place of nutmeg for a unique twist. A dash of ginger can also give a lovely warm undertone.
  4. Crust Flavors: Add a pinch of orange or lemon zest to the pie crust for a subtle citrus hint.
  5. Syrup Alternative: If you’re not keen on using the lite syrup from canned peaches, you can make your own simple syrup with sugar and water, or even add a splash of bourbon for a boozy touch.
  6. Dairy-Free: If you’re dairy-intolerant, use coconut oil or a vegan butter substitute in the pie crust and filling.
  7. Gluten-Free: Swap the all-purpose flour with a gluten-free baking mix for the crust.
  8. Toppings: Before baking, sprinkle the cobbler with sliced almonds or crushed pecans for added texture. Alternatively, for serving, a dollop of whipped cream or a scoop of vanilla ice cream never goes amiss.

Remember that putting your own spin on a recipe, adding a little this and tweaking a little that, is what makes cooking so much fun. As long as you’ve got those key ingredients down, go ahead and sprinkle in your personal touch – cook from your heart and let the ancestors guide you!

Peach cobbler with canned peaches in a baking dish with a portion missing and the spoon in the dish.

What to Serve with It

How to Store & Reheat

Southern peach cobbler is best eaten the day it’s made, but leftovers can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

You can enjoy it cold, at room temperature, or reheated. If you want to reheat, place the cobbler in the oven at 350°F for 10-15 minutes or until heated through.

How long does peach cobbler last in the fridge?

It will last up to three days after making it. Cover it well or transfer it to an airtight container for best results.

Can I freeze peach cobbler?

I truly believe it’s best eaten on the first day, but if have leftovers and want to store them longer than three days you can freeze it for up to one month as long as it’s wrapped well.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can you make peach cobbler with canned peaches?

Yes, of course! Now before you start to frown at canned peaches being used in this recipe.  My mama made peach cobbler year round with canned peaches so we could taste this deliciousness anytime we wanted.  I personally like to use canned peaches in a light syrup so I can develop my own syrup.   I drain most of the syrup from all of the cans except for one and add additional liquid to the melted butter. It gives the peaches that buttery flavor without making too much sauce.

How do I use fresh peaches to make peach cobbler?

If you want to go the fresh peach route, you can do that as well. I certainly love to use fresh peaches in the summertime as soon as they are in season. In the Midwest, peach season begins around July and August, so that’s the best time to grab them for this recipe. For the equivalent, you will need about 3 3/4 cups of peach slices. To easily peel peaches, drop them in a large pot of boiling water for about 20 seconds, then quickly transfer them in ice water to cool them down so they don’t continue cooking. At that point, the skin should easily come off. You will need to add more butter and sugar and lessen the amount of flour to create more syrup when using fresh peaches. You won’t be starting with the light syrup from the canned peaches so you will need to adjust with a bit more liquid. Make sure you taste the syrup and get it to the thickness and sweetness you prefer when making this adjustment.

What makes a Southern-style cobbler different from a pie?

The peaches will need additional ingredients to create a lovely syrup. This is what really makes the difference between this being a pie and a Southern cobbler. The additional juices really take it to another level. The filling ingredients below develop on your stovetop and thicken to create a substantial syrup to drown those peaches in.

Southern-style cobbler featuring canned and fresh peaches served in a large white cooking dish.

My peach cobbler is more than just a dessert—it’s a celebration of Southern heritage in every spoonful. Every bite of this is keeping my Big Mama’s legacy alive. Perfect for Sunday family dinners, picnics, or any occasion that calls for a taste of nostalgia. Let her timeless old fashion recipe transport you to warm summer evenings on a the porch, where life is sweet, and so is the dessert.

Peach Dessert Recipes

If you like this southern peach cobbler recipe, then I know you’ll love some of my other peach dessert recipes.

*Did you make this recipe? Please give it a star rating and leave comments below!* Post a photo of how your version of the recipe came out on Instagram (using #grandbabycakes)!!

Labor Day Recipes - Southern Peach Cobbler Recipe (How to Make Peach Cobbler)

Southern Peach Cobbler Recipe with Canned Peaches

This old-fashioned peach cobbler recipe is a Southern classic made with canned peaches and a homemade pie crust!
4.65 from 139 votes
Prep Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
0 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 15 minutes
Course: Dessert
Servings: 12 servings

Ingredients

For the Peach Filling:

  • 3 can peaches in lite syrup 29 ounces each (if using fresh peaches- see notes below)
  • ½ cup salted butter 1 stick
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • 3 teaspoons all-purpose flour

For the Pie Crust:

  • 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup very cold unsalted butter, cut in cubes 2 sticks
  • ½-⅔ cup very cold water
  • 1 egg beaten with 1 teaspoon of water.
  • Ground cinnamon for garnish

Instructions

For the Peach Cobbler Filling:

  • Drain two of the cans of peaches and add just peaches to a large pot. Add the remaining can of peaches with lite syrup along with butter to a large pot over medium heat and allow everything to melt together.
  • Once butter completely melts, stir in sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla and allow peaches to come to a boil.
  • Once boiling, remove 3 tablespoons of peach syrup from large pot and place in a small bowl. Whisk flour into small bowl of peach syrup until completely combined creating a slurry then stir into the pot of peaches.
  • Cook an additional 30-40 minutes or until syrup thickens and coats the back of a spoon then remove from heat and allow to cool down and further thicken while you make pie crust.

For the Pie Crust:

  • In a medium sized bowl, add flour, sugar and salt and whisk together to combine.
  • Next add your butter cubes to flour and using your pastry cutter, cut the butter into the flour mixture until various sized crumbs appear.
  • Slowly add the cold water into the flour until a ball of dough forms. Start with ½ cup and add more water if you need it. Knead the dough quickly to bring it together. Don’t worry if there is any flour left in the bowl.
  • Remove the dough from the bowl, cut into 2 sections and round into balls. Cover each ball tightly with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for 35-45 minutes to rest.

To assemble the cobbler:

  • Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  • Remove dough from fridge and add a bit of flour to a working surface or clean counter and place dough on it. Unwrap one ball of dough. Using a rolling pin, quickly roll dough out to about ⅓ inch thickness and place on the bottom and up sides of a 9×13 inch baking pan.
  • Using a slotted spoon, remove just the peaches from the pot and spoon on top of dough. Next pour the remaining syrup to the peaches (if you like less syrup you can use less. Totally up to you but I wouldn’t use less than 2/3s since it will continue to thicken when baked).
  • Roll out the final dough ball and decorate the top of the peach cobbler how you see fit with the dough.
  • Brush the top of the dough with egg wash then sprinkle slightly with ground cinnamon.
  • Bake for 40-45 minutes or until crust is beautifully golden brown. Cool down and serve.

Video

Notes

  • Make sure you use real vanilla extract and not imitation. You can truly taste the difference.
  • If you’re using fresh peaches, make sure they’re ripe for the best flavor. When they aren’t in season, it just isn’t the same.
  • Don’t over-mix the dough for the pie crust, as this can make it tough.
  • If you use frozen or fresh peaches you will need to add a bit more butter and sugar when making the syrup since you won’t be getting a head start with syrup from one of the cans.
  • It is important that you keep all of your ingredients very cold when making this so it comes out exactly like you want it. It’s the key to a flaky pie crust.
  • Don’t be afraid to get creative with the pie crust toppings. You can use a lattice pattern, a criss-cross pattern, or even cut the dough into decorative shapes.
Using Fresh or Frozen Peaches
For the equivalent you will need about 3 3/4 cups of peach slices. To easily peel peaches, drop them in a large pot of boiling water for about 20 seconds then quickly transfer them in ice water to cool them down so they don’t continue cooking. At that point, the skin should easily come off.
You will need to add more butter and sugar and lessen the amount of flour to create more syrup when using fresh peaches. You won’t be starting with the light syrup from the canned peaches so you will need to adjust with a bit more liquid. Make sure you taste the syrup and get it to the thickness and sweetness you prefer when making this adjustment.

Nutrition

Calories: 418kcal | Carbohydrates: 48g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 23g | Saturated Fat: 14g | Cholesterol: 74mg | Sodium: 269mg | Potassium: 242mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 26g | Vitamin A: 1080IU | Vitamin C: 7.1mg | Calcium: 19mg | Iron: 1.6mg
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Filed Under:  Crisps, Cobblers, Dumplings and Tarts, Dessert and Baking, Father's Day, Oven, Seasonal Recipes, Summer Recipes

Comments

  1. I have been looking for a peach cobbler recipe that was close to the one that my mother-in-law used to make…she passed and no one had the recipe. I found this one! It is absolutely amazing! I used store bought dough to save time but will definitely make my own dough the next time that I make it. I made it for Thanksgiving and there was none left!!

  2. This came out perfect! Thank you very much. I didn’t have a pastry cutter so I used a fork. My arm got a good workout 🙂 I’ll definitely purchase one before making crust from scratch again. I did just miner tweeks like adding a dash of lemon extract, two tablespoons of maple syrup and an extra 3/4 cup of sugar. I do not use anything with high fructose corn syrup. So even the light syrup peach cans have the high fructose. Other than that no changes. LOL. Oh yeah. Since I had never rolled out pastry for a 9×13 pan, I didn’t have enough to stay on the sides. Crust on the bottom and a little extra following the bottom curves of the pan was just fine. The top crust and taste made up for it! Thanks again.
    P.S. I wish I could send you the little video of it sizzling right out of the oven!

    1. I made this peach cobbler recipe on Thanksgiving. IT WAS THE BOMB.COM! Perfectly delicious, just the right amount of sweet. Heading to the store right now for more peaches so I can do it again. thank you so much for sharing your recipe.

  3. Good taste but my syrup didn’t really thicken even after adding more syrup. I also felt like the crust was not as good as your apple pie one. I’ll make a few edits next time but flavors were good!

    1. Yes but you will need to cut the recipe because it makes way too much for this unless you use 2 9 inch pans.

  4. Thank you for sharing your awesome recipe! I found all the ingredients and easy to follow instructions as you provided. My cobbler turned out amazing! Thanks again!

    1. Jeff, if you scroll to the bottom of the recipe, the full recipe card with ingredients and instructions are there. No need to trash my recipe when the full instructions are there if you take a little patience to find it. Have a great Thanksgiving.

4.65 from 139 votes (66 ratings without comment)

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